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CODED CROCHET

DIGITAL CRAFTING

David Pye describes the difference between craft and manufacturing as the “craftsmanship of risk” and the “craftsmanship of certainty.” The ideal of craft plays a large role in my work - the acts of accident, discovery, and capitalization are crucial to design process.

This piece seeks to blur the line between craft and manufacturing by translating a traditionally hand craft, crochet, into a new medium through the use of equipment traditionally used for manufacturing, CNC Milling.

More importantly, the method of making creates a “craftsmanship of risk” within a manufacturing medium through the development of digital craft. This piece and its preceding prototypes were derived from multiple iterations of milling simulations, often sending the final G Code to mill with no certainty of how the pattern would manifest in material. Represented here is the final calibration of these experiments.

2012 

Research Seminar | Pratt Institute

Instructor Ronnie Parsons

INTERACTIVE FAB

The shell pavilion...

ROBOTIC DRAWING

The Shell Pavilion is result of a month long workshop in Shanghai called Robotic Force between Tongji University, ETH, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

The first half of the workshop used graphic statics to find forms in structural equilibrium with tools like Rhino Vault. These forms were then considered for discretization and fabrication. Using an ABB robotic arm to 3D print plastic, material testing occurred during the design development process to create a design feedback loop where form, material, and geometry effects were considered at both the local and global scale.

Our final form was driven by the requirements that we wanted it to fit within a circular baseplate, feel like an enclosure, and have parts that crossed over each other - all of this, using a few parts as possible. To do this we discretized the final form into seven developable strips using a technique that allowed double curvature to be created out of single curvature that appoximated double curvature.

We 3D printed these developable panels using the robot and were able to assemble them quickly and without much of the waste that comes with traditional scaffoding. We then applied three layes of brick on top of the plastic scaffolding - once dry, this brick acts in perfect compression and results in an ultra-thin but structurally stable shell structure.

MACHINE DIALOGUES

The Shell Pavilion is result of a month long workshop in Shanghai called Robotic Force between Tongji University, ETH, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

The first half of the workshop used graphic statics to find forms in structural equilibrium with tools like Rhino Vault. These forms were then considered for discretization and fabrication. Using an ABB robotic arm to 3D print plastic, material testing occurred during the design development process to create a design feedback loop where form, material, and geometry effects were considered at both the local and global scale.

Our final form was driven by the requirements that we wanted it to fit within a circular baseplate, feel like an enclosure, and have parts that crossed over each other - all of this, using a few parts as possible. To do this we discretized the final form into seven developable strips using a technique that allowed double curvature to be created out of single curvature that appoximated double curvature.

We 3D printed these developable panels using the robot and were able to assemble them quickly and without much of the waste that comes with traditional scaffoding. We then applied three layes of brick on top of the plastic scaffolding - once dry, this brick acts in perfect compression and results in an ultra-thin but structurally stable shell structure.

MOLLY MASON

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